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Cleaning Wood Exterior Doors

The first task is to take a look at the type of door you have and the amount of dirt and grime you need to get rid of. For both the preparation and the cleaning, you may only need some of the supplies here. For certain types of door, or depending on the task in hand, you may need them all.

To prepare your door for cleaning, any of the following equipment may be required: a vacuum with a hose and brush attachment, paper towels or soft rags, a feather duster, a small artist’s paintbrush, a step-ladder, and a broom.

For the cleaning step of the process, we may need any of the following: soft rags and soft sponges, a commercial wood cleaner such as Murphy’s Oil Soap, a homemade cleaning solution of dish soap, one teaspoon of baking soda, and four cups of hot water, glass cleaner (newspapers make a good cleaning rag that won’t leave streaks on glass), commercial metal cleaner or hot soapy water for metal door fixtures, and oil for use on hinges.

Use a commercial product or the homemade mixture for cleaning wood exterior doors without paint. For doors with paint, use the homemade solution; don’t use Murphy’s Oil Soap.

Before you can actually clean your wood exterior doors, you’ll need to get rid of the dust and dirt that has accumulated on it.

Open the door and start at the top of the door frame, using the brush attachment on the vacuum cleaner everywhere possible. Then dust with paper towels, rags, or a feather duster in the places the vacuum cleaner couldn’t reach.

Dust the entire door frame and door from top to bottom, and use this time to inspect the door for stains and damage. Use the little paintbrush to get into any cracks.

Finally, sweep up the entryway, inside and out.